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Author Archive: bfwebster

Webster is Principal and Founder at at Bruce F. Webster & Associates, as well as an Adjunct Professor for the BYU Computer Science Department. He works with organizations to help them with troubled or failed information technology (IT) projects. He has also worked in several dozen legal cases as a consultant and as a testifying expert, both in the United States and Japan. He can be reached at 303.502.4141 or at bwebster@bfwa.com.

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CS 428 – Winter 2019 – Webster #01 readings

February 8, 2019 0 Comments
CS 428 – Winter 2019 – Webster #01 readings

In-class lecture on three of my blog posts on software engineering: The Real Software Crisis — an article published in BYTE (January, 1996) The Wetware Crisis: TEPES — A follow-up post written in 2008 The Wetware Crisis: The Dead Sea Effect — How IT organizations can go bad

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The Mythical Man-Month, part 2 (CS 428, Winter 2019)

February 5, 2019 0 Comments
The Mythical Man-Month, part 2 (CS 428, Winter 2019)

My in-class lecture covering chapters 4, 7, 11 and 14 of The Mythical Man-Month by Fred Brooks.

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The Mythical Man-Month by Fred Brooks, part 1 (CS 428, Winter 2019)

January 15, 2019 0 Comments
<i>The Mythical Man-Month</i> by Fred Brooks, part 1 (CS 428, Winter 2019)

My in-class lecture covering the first few chapters of The Mythical Man-Month by Fred Brooks.

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“The Five Orders of Ignorance” (CS 428, Winter 2019)

January 10, 2019 2 Comments
“The Five Orders of Ignorance” (CS 428, Winter 2019)

New semester, new posts. Here is my lecture on 1/07/2019 about the appendix “The Five Orders of Ignorance” found in Philip Armour’s book, The Laws of Software Process. I consider this to be an extremely important set of insights as to why so many software projects are late or fail altogether.

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Displacing entrenched technology

November 14, 2018 1 Comment
Displacing entrenched technology

Successful technology — and I’m using the term broadly here, not just limiting myself to digital tech — has a propensity to entrench itself and then become very hard to displace, at least directly. A classic example is the internal combustion automobile (which I’ll call the “gas auto” for shorthand). Commercial production started over 130 […]

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